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Distributor Pubcast Episode 3: You Need a (Dream) Team

by Matt Johnson, on May 12, 2021 10:01:00 AM

On this episode, Matt and Dave sit down to discuss the leadership, staff, and project ownership needed to build, launch, and grow a B2B eCommerce website.

 

On this episode of the Distributor Pubcast, you'll learn:

  • Why eCommerce should be a strategic initiative
  • Leadership is key to B2B eCommerce success
  • Who you need to champion the project
  • What is the "prototype" for an eCommerce manager
  • Best practices for aligning sales and customer adoption

FREE DOWNLOAD: If you haven't done so already, we encourage you to download and read our newest resource from Distributor Marketing University: eComm-Wheel of Growth: a proven methodology for building, launching, and growing a B2B eCommerce website that gets results.

On tap:


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Creating a Dream Team

Matt Johnson:
We just did a virtual conference with our partners at DCKAP. I talked about the Ecom Wheel of Growth, which by the way, early plug in the podcast. If you have not been able to download the Ecom Wheel of growth ebook, it is now out on our distributor marketing university website. Go check that out, download it.

ecomm-wheel of growth ebook download

But you know what? I was doing this talk and I got to the team part in the Ecom Wheel of Growth where we talk about the importance of building your team for a successful ecommerce project. And it just really hit me as I was talking about it, how important it is to really invest in the team to make this a success. So it's one thing to pick out the ecommerce software or the service providers, but it's another thing to have somebody in-house to actually run the project, champion the project.

And then on top of that I had a great call with one of our customers, Dave. She blew me away by how well thought out the project was from her end from the top down. And we were doing a case study interview. It's no wonder why they've been successful and I think they're going to be very successful in the future because they've got the right people. So that's what I wanted to talk about today, was people, team, staff. How do you put together a team that can be successful in an ecommerce initiative, and what does that look like from the leadership all the way down to the folks that are running the platform?

Dave Bent:
Yeah. I think, Matt, it's a topic that we've run into a lot. Actually I can honestly say a topic that I've personally experienced as an implementer of projects in companies where I think maybe not everybody watching will know obviously, but I ran IT in a lot of large companies before joining ES Tech. Quite often, ecommerce is thought of as a tech project. And I always say as the IT guy, there is never a technology project; there's a business project that leverages technology. 

And so I think number one is it has to be a business-led initiative, because it is a change to the business. And every change has people, process, and technology. I've said that many times before. And so probably the number one thing I think, Matt, is the right executive sponsor, and that someone in the business in the executive team, I think, is usually the best thing. And it's truly a business priority to get started. Maybe I'll just stop there for a second, Matt, and get your thoughts.

Same Team. Same Dream.

Matt Johnson:
Yeah. A lot of businesses organize their strategy in different ways. There's lots of methodologies out there for running your business and planning. So it's got to be one of those things where, I think, it's one of those things where you get together. I don't know if you're getting together at the end of the year or maybe getting halfway through the last quarter of the year and you're reviewing where you've been, and you're looking forward to the year to come, and you're making budgets, and you're talking about staff, and you're talking about strategic initiatives that are going to move the business forward. And I think at this time is when the conversation has to come up. It's like okay guys we've been talking, we've been batting around this idea of ecommerce. Who's going to do it? Are we going to do it? And how? How is it going to work?

And I think it's going to take no less than... You have to have that executive sponsor, but I think at the same time it's like the whole leadership team has to be on board with it no matter what depth they're running. So if they're in operations, or they're in accounting, they're in sales or marketing, we've got to get everybody on the same page. And we've got to first understand the need and all feel it. We've got to all feel the need and know how important it is. And if there's any doubt whatsoever, we got to clear that up first before we start assigning projects to people. 

Because I feel like so many times it's like distributors know what's important and then they start the project, but the entire organization isn't behind it. It feels siloed in a way. And I think that can be a real problem, because if everybody's not behind it, how are we going to expect our customers to adopt it and get our sales team to use it as well? The message has to be we have to be all in, right?

Dave Bent:
Yeah, right. I agree. It is actually a strange coincidence, but about 90 minutes ago I got an email from a distributor who we've been talking to. And they initially said, "We think it's a 2022 project," which actually I like because it means that they've got a plan and priorities. And the good thing anyway is they just emailed and said, "We've just decided to switch our priority sequence, and the CEO's just told us we're going to start this in Q3." But the point I'm saying that is, I know immediately then it's a senior level major initiative for the business. I think it's key, because it actually makes me feel comfortable that they can be successful. And sometimes you don't hear that level of engagement, and it's like a project from the side, which certainly ecommerce I don't think should ever be a project on the side. It's changing the way you engage with customers, so what could be more important? So, yeah.

Matt Johnson:
And I think assuming that we are all on board with the project, with the initiative, I think the next question you have to ask yourself is, do we have the talent in-house to be able to champion the initiative? Somebody who we can turn to every month, every quarter we can ask, "How's this going?" And somebody who can be accountable for the results. Somebody who can pull in the resources that are going to be required to make this happen. So you're going to have to be talking to your ERP provider, the ecommerce service provider, graphic design, and content people. There's a lot to wrangle, and then you have to be able to communicate all that back to leadership and then pull in resources in the organization as needed along the way. 

This isn't exactly an entry-level position that we're talking about. This is somebody who has to have the intangibles, the soft skills, but also they have to be driven to go out there and learn, because this isn't something that everybody natively knows. I didn't come out of school thinking I was going to get into B2B ecommerce. It wasn't something I was taught. I had to learn it myself through a lot of different mediums. So I think that's the first question, Dave. Do they have the talent in-house? And I would think most of the time the answer is probably no. What do you think?

Dave Bent:
I think very often it is, at least in smaller businesses who are just getting started with ecommerce, it's very often no. But even in larger distributors and companies that we engage with, the engagement model with the customer is so different, it may be a different talent, different person than is on board. And I think a lot of people have arguably a really good reaction that says, "Hey, I need one of those digital natives," dare I use that phrase. It sounded derogatory the way I said it. It wasn't meant to be. But I kind of need somebody who's in that generation, and I may not have that. But also has really good business sense, and ideally maybe some experience of running a website. 

And the only thing that I would add that I actually am pretty passionate about is, if you're in that situation don't hire somebody who's been a business to consumer solution provider, like somebody from a retail kind of business, because it is ecommerce but it's so completely different in a B2B procurement scenario versus a consumer shopping scenario. The approaches are different. So if you're hiring, try and find somebody who's coming out of the B2B space who has done it. Maybe a competitor who's done it and appears to have done it successfully, for sure.

Think Differently

Matt Johnson:
It's funny. I'd love for you to tease that out a little bit more, but I just remember when I was making one of our video courses for industrial distributors, I remember I started off sort of the promo video joking around. And I was kind of playing fun at this idea of hiring this millennial who would come in and he would be telling you, "Hey, you need to do SEM, and SEO, and PPC, and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. Retargeting social media, yada, yada." And I say, "You don't need that. That's what everybody else does. You're a B2B distributor. You need to think a little differently." 

Most people could really relate to that because I think it's very confusing when somebody from the B2C world comes in and starts talking about all of these, I would call them all of these peripheral strategies related to ecommerce, when really it's kind of like you're missing the real core of what the buying experience needs to be like for a business. So maybe you can talk a little bit more about just why that is such a big difference, and why people who have a background in B2C or other types of marketing just don't really get it, they're not understanding the complexities.

Dave Bent:
Yeah, I actually think, and this is often true though with distributors that have not done ecommerce before, there's often a reaction that I'm going to get a website because the website is what's going to find new customers for me. And that actually is, I would say, that's more true in a business to consumer environment. If you do the right things with the website, the right setup, the SEO, all of those things, a lot of consumer activity as we all know personally, you go on Google and you Google for a product and you then find somebody with a website that's got it. Or you go on Amazon and do your B2C.

And it's very different, the engagement's different. You're actually prospecting to people you've never talked to before, more likely than not. Because most consumer businesses don't have that repeat element, at least most of them. Whereas in business it's an established relationship, it's got payment methods, and it's really an established relationship where there's a meaningful dependency between the customer and the seller, the distributor. And so the engagement is different. I think the number one reason, honestly, if you haven't done ecommerce or if you're going to the next level, number one driver is to sell more to your existing customers. The secondary driver is to use it to find new customers and maybe turn them into account customers. But number one is to sell to more customers, and so it's a different kind of marketing. It's more of a... A lot of the thing is how do you make it easier to do business with that? How does it make it easier for the customer to do business with you? 

And so, it's actually knowing the customer and the promotions that maybe you're running email, whatever it is, that focused on that type of customer. So maybe you've segmented your customers into a certain type of customer and you know the type of products they buy on a repeat basis. And all of that engagement is streamlining their procurement process. You can actually argue that on B2C there's a lot of browsing and looking around. And in procurement you could argue basically people want to get on the site, buy what they want and get off and go do something else. But it's still an engagement, and so a lot of it is how do you make the experience streamlined and easy? It's this whole phrase, "easy to do business with." And I could keep going but I'll stop again. What does that really look like? But it's absolutely different to B2C.

Matt Johnson:
Yeah. And it's also really about creating synergy between the offline experience, and building that online experience so that it really mirrors that customer engagement with a sales rep. And I think that to me one of the biggest differences is like, if I'm going to go from my sales rep coming and visiting me and giving me that hands-on experience, then I've got to have something similar to that comparable when I log in. And it just can't be a feed yourself kind of scenario. You need to be able to really fine tune the buying experience online so that it reflects that kind of level of service that you're getting with a traditional sales rep.

And you're right, Dave. The big driver in this whole thing from a marketing perspective is not necessarily customer acquisition, but customer adoption and increasing average order value, increasing lifetime customer value through the store. Because we talk about this a lot, but it's this, and you mentioned it last week, but that slow bleed. And the fact that especially in hard goods, so many distributor's customers are buying from multiple suppliers. And their opportunity to increase your share wallet is really the big game changer here. And that's what most distributors should be focused on is, how can I get really sticky with my existing customer base, and then use my website to grow that shared wallet and get more of spend that I'm not getting today because they're going to other online retailers?

Setting The Foundation

Matt Johnson:
That to me is the priority. You've got to have somebody that understands the concept. So going back to the team, it's like you almost would be better finding somebody in... It's a unicorn proposition. It's kind of like finding somebody that doesn't really exist. But if you had somebody in your team who was maybe in sales or maybe even in the procurement side. Somebody who understands the concept of the business and the value proposition who also was technologically savvy enough to come in and manage relationships and the technology in such a way that it is really is turning that value proposition into a tangible online experience, that's the kind of person that would potentially work out if they were on staff. It is rare, but gosh if you had that it'd be great. You don't have to teach them everything from the beginning.

Dave Bent:
For sure. Actually Matt, that whole dialogue of what's the focus area just goes back full circle to... We said you've got to have the right sponsorship for the project, but the other thing is really, and I know you're big into this, but why is the company taking on the project? What are goals, what are the key performance indicators, what are the measures of success going to be? And if the worst case is somebody says, "I'm putting up a website because my neighboring competitor just put one up and I feel like I've got to have something better than what I have now," but it's just a website. That's kind of a bad scenario, because it's got to be much more than that. So what are the metrics and drivers that basically say this is why it's a strategy or a strategic initiative, sorry, and this is why we're going to spend money on it, and here's actually what we think the ROI might be because there's a clear vision as to what the outcome should be 12 months, 24 months in.

So yeah, I think it's the people. That's kind of the foundation of getting the project off on a good footing. The right sponsorship, the right level of strategic importance, the metrics, and then absolutely the right person who's going to champion and lead the initiative. That's just the foundation to having success.

Matt Johnson:
I wanted to bring up somebody who I think is that prototype who I met with recently and just kind of sketch out who she is and kind of what she did to make the ecommerce project successful. I thought that might be fun to do, just because I know that if a distributor's listening to this they're kind of thinking, "Okay, you told me who not to hire. What does that person actually look like? Who should I hire? Who am I looking for?"

Dave Bent:
When she comes on, Matt, I'm not going to tell her you called her a prototype.

Matt Johnson:
Did I say prototype? Well I told her and she laughed at this. But I told her, I was like, "If I could clone you and put you into every one of our distributor's offices, we would just be blowing everything up. We would kill Amazon." 

Dave Bent:
Yes.

Matt Johnson:
The idea is that she has a background in web design, so she already understood the concept of putting up a website. She'd been through that many times, so she understood. May not have been an ecommerce website or it wasn't a B2B ecommerce website, but she understood the process, that there's going to be multiple people involved, communication was going to be important, organization was going to be important, sticking to timelines, having integrity around deadlines and deliverables. She already got that part. Those are sort of the prerequisites. But then what I thought was really cool is that she understood the business because she had been working with this distributor for so long on a contract basis. So it made her very... It sped up the whole process of her learning what the company's mission and direction was. So those two things combined made her very dangerous from the outset. So she just was a great fit.

But there was something else that I'll say aside from sort of those basic skill sets, is that she had the drive. The energy and the desire to be successful. There's got to be... And I don't have any clue on how she was compensated. I don't know if there was a bonus or whatever involved. Probably that's a good idea. But I just sensed this... It's this sense of urgency, Dave. That was the thing that impressed me the most. It was not something that was just going to trudge along. And she was the firs one of a group of distributors that were kind of implementing and launching together. And no shock that she was the first one to launch her website because think from a personality standpoint those are the things that you can't teach. It's just you have that or you don't have it.

Dave Bent:
Yeah, absolutely. 

Matt Johnson:
What do you think? Tell me what you think about her and her skill sets and why those might be important.

Dave Bent:
Definitely the web background. Dare I say the age. She is somewhat not truly a digital native. Anyway, that experience is for sure important. And then actually I sensed, as you said she has an understanding of the business, but through her time there she's built the trust of the business partners. And that trust of, "Yeah we're all in this together and I'm part of it, it's not all about me," I think is huge, too. Because it's back to, has that person got the trust of a larger portion of the team and maybe actually interacted with them? So it's a really difficult role to fill, because I guess what we just said Matt, is you need to hire somebody for a year before you want to start the project, in a way. 

So I don't know. There's definitely the opportunity to go hire from a competitor who appears to be doing it well. Or maybe, the other thing too, is there's... We often refer to them as big box companies in a certain vertical. So like Grainger in industrial, or MSC in industrial, or WESCO in electrical, or Linde and Airgas in the gas world. Staples in the business supplies world. So maybe there's a chance, and I've definitely seen that go hire a more junior person out of one of those companies too.

Matt Johnson:
I was just going to say, go stalked their LinkedIn pages, right?

Dave Bent:
Yes.

Matt Johnson:
Filter through there and see who you can find and message them.

Dave Bent:
And maybe they're more junior in one of those big companies but they've got a chance to come in and lead a whole initiative in a smaller business. So yeah, I think that's huge for sure. 

“An Ecommerce Initiative Is Like A Digital Branch”

Dave Bent:
Matt I've got another topic, another thought just building on all of this. Something that I think... I'm not sure I agree with a lot of consultants that show up and say, "An ecommerce initiative is like a digital branch." Maybe just to explain because it's different in different industries, but a lot of distributors, manufacturers have multiple locations. And you might call it a store, or some call it a branch, some call it a depot. But somewhere where actually there's some sales people, maybe a point of sale. And people engage and they come into the branch and buy products. And so historically, setting up a new location has been a key aspect of expanding the business, a branch.

And so there's a lot of people who say, "Well ecommerce, it's like another branch." And I would say one aspect of that for me is true. Meaning it's as important and as much energy and effort as opening a branch, but for me it kind of says this digital branch sits off on the side. It implies it sits on the side, not part of the core business. And I think if you view it as sitting off on the side rather than part of core and changing the core, impacting every branch, actually impacting maybe how you manage your supply chain, your warehouse, your delivery, logistics, I think you're missing something. So let's just, again just my perspective, this idea of think of it as a branch implies for the people who are not part of the digital branch, okay they're going to worry about that. But it isn't, because it's changing so much about how you engage customers across the whole business. Sorry, came to the mind, but-

Matt Johnson:
No, that's right. You're right about that, Dave. It goes back to what we started off with. It's like not having the buy-in of the entire organization, not bringing in different please. Because at the end of the day you're going to need the entire team at some point. It cannot be a siloed effort because you're going to need product experts, you're really going to need the sales team to work together to make it successful.

Dave Bent:
Yes.

Matt Johnson:
Speaking of this prototype, which I think is a very flattering term, matter of fact. But speaking of this prototype, she did something that I thought was so cool, or she is doing this. The site is out, it's launched, and she is in the process of this beta period, this beta launch. So it's a soft launch, she's not rolling this out to every customer. They have hundreds of customers. Instead, they're going and they have multiple branches. She's going branch by branch, physically going to the branch with the sales reps who are there and targeting one or two customers at each branch, and getting them to set up a meeting. And physically going out to the customer, sitting down with them, opening up a laptop, and walking them through the online experience. Teaching everything that they need to know about the new website. Here's how you log in, here's how you view your contract items, here's where you can contact your sales rep, here's where you can view your account balance, and all this stuff. It's just, wow. 

I was impressed, because I haven't met very many distributors that... There are a couple that are super successful that have done that, but to go to that extra effort and sit down with the sales reps does a couple of things. Number one is it really enforces to the customer how important this is and how much energy they've put into it, and really selling it to them. But at the same time, you're selling it to the sales rep. You're bringing the sales rep into the process and getting them to get to the point where they are comfortable enough to go out and do the same thing. So she's like feeding out the first few in all of these branches, and then the expectation is that those sales reps will be able to repeat that process and get their customers to adopt the platform. I just thought it was one of the smartest adoption efforts that I've seen in a long time.

Dave Bent:
It is, and I actually think Matt the sales team is the chief change agent for success, meaning they own the relationship with the customer. Hopefully they're actually a trusted advisor to the customer. That's where the trust is, the relationship, the integrity. And so the sales person, certainly around launch or even with a new customer is identified, basically should sell it a website. Like, "Here's why it's awesome to use it, and here's how. I've helped you start this up. I've already set up your most frequently purchased item list on your easy reorder stuff. It's already there." And the sales person is really engaged and is pitching to the customer why it's great for them to use the website, what the benefits are, how it's going to streamline their activity and help them track their spend and budgets. So anyway I think the sales person should be the chief change... I can't say it, chief change agent. It wasn't the Los Osuna, sorry. Got the tongue tied. 

Matt Johnson:
Say that three times fast.

Dave Bent:
Yes, really. But no, they are absolutely critical to success. But what often happens is, the sales team is not engaged at the start of the project, they're actually suspicious. They're like, "This is a threat to... Do they need me anymore?" Well yeah, we definitely need you. But they see it as a threat. "Is my commission safe?" Well yeah, your commission better be set up so that you get the same commission as you get today on every sale. And a big part of the job is promoting the site to drive their share of spend. "This is why it's better if you buy with us, and hopefully if the site's well done, we've got the best customer experience for you, Mr. Or Mrs. Customer. And here's why it's the best experience."

Everything from... I said it already, but budget tracking, mapping orders directly against cost sensors in the customer so they can see where the spend is going. Providing work flow on approval of orders, if it's large value, high value orders. All of those things are awesome. And actually it helps the sales person sell more stuff, which takes their commission higher, maybe helps them free up some time to launch new products, new categories, engage customers more deeply on complex sales. So anyway.

Matt Johnson:
It's amazing, because a lot of them are thinking that it's a threat, it's a, "Am I going to lose my commission? Am I going to lose the relationship?" It's actually crazy how it's just the exact opposite.

Dave Bent:
Right.

Matt Johnson:
Because it really solidifies the relationship with your customer. Just because they have an ecommerce website doesn't mean you go away. One of the things that we just... I was just working with a client who didn't realize how to set up the widget in the dashboard so that your sales rep can show up with their photo and their contact information. So when a customer logs into the website and they get to the portal it's like, there's your sales rep staring right at you. "Hey, how can I help you today?" It's connecting the online with the offline experience, and making that relationship even stickier than it was before, but it's just now it's just so much easier to go out and win new business. It's so much easier to upsell and cross sell those existing customers. I just don't know... 

And I think it comes back to leadership, Dave. It's like, at some point the tail starts wagging the dog in some of these distributor businesses where the sales reps will push back on an initiative really out of ignorance. And the ownership, because the sales reps are so valuable and they own those relationships, they'll kind of go, "Whoa, I guess this isn't for us. Or even if it is for us, we won't tie it into commission plans, and we won't bring our sales reps in. It'll be siloed off to the side," and that's a recipe for failure.

Dave Bent:
Yeah, 200%. Yes. We've seen it, sadly.

Matt Johnson:
All right, well I guess the one thing that we didn't talk much about, and maybe we'll wrap up here is, some of the other maybe let's call them supporting roles. So you have a project champion, and we've talked a lot about that. We've talked about the sales team. What are some of the supporting roles that you might need to bring into your ecommerce project?

Dave Bent:
Yeah. I think certainly if you have anticipation of meaningful business, or certainly if you're upgrading your existing site to a new site, there's got to be some bandwidth from an IT perspective. And I say IT really because connecting maybe to the back office, the ERP system. Maybe getting data cleansed and sorted so that the data flow between the front end and the back end works really well. So there's always some need for some IT bandwidth, or at least almost always. 

And then I think the other thing is also just thinking through kind of the current scenario of the supply chain. Like we've all become customers who want everything now, or at least tomorrow, delivered. Two days. And just thinking through where is your logistics and supply chain capability at, and how do you bring that to the website? Because maybe you have stock items that could be, I'll say delivered tomorrow, but you have a number of SKUs where there's a lead time. And just think about engaging the supply chain side of the house on how we represent that on the website? Because you can have non-stock stock items, different delivery expectations, but that all has to kind of play out on the website. So as the customer engages, they have the right expectation. It seems a little abstract when you first start thinking about a website, but I actually think it's pretty, it's a pretty important part of it. 

And then how do you... Customer wants to come and check the order status. So how do you get that information back out? And again, does that happen today? In the offline world does the customer get updated? And so there's this kind of expectation that, again, reaches down into the organization that needs thinking through. 

Looking For Help From Outside

Matt Johnson:
No, you're right. You're right on. I think that's a neglected part of this, is thinking about re-evaluating our supplier relationships prior to going into an ecommerce initiative. Do we have the right companies that are offering the right delivery terms and the right service agreements with us? That would be one thing that I would say, that's something to consider. On the IT side, do we have the right ERP system? Can we integrate with the ecommerce platform that we want to go with? These are things that we should all be talking about prior to getting started. And again, spearheaded by that marketing, that project champion.

One other thing, Dave, that I can't help but bring up because it's kind of near and dear to my heart, is what do you do if you are a small distributor and... Let's just say you've got less than 20 people. And at the thought of adding a full-time digital native, as you call them, to run the project is just beyond your budgeting. It's beyond the constraints of your budget. So what are some options?

One of the things that we're excited about is that we brought in the Spinstak team into the ES Tech Group family, which means that we're now able to offer outsourced services for this type of role. So somebody at the business has to still spearhead the project, we need that executive ownership at the end of the day, and that's super important. But the nice thing is that with what we're doing at Spinstak is we're basically taking somebody who can play the role of that project champion and really wrangle all of the pieces that are required to make the website a success. So that means working with the development team, working with the integration partner, working with your content partner, loading content, doing sort of the heavy lifting that takes a lot of man hours, right?

Dave Bent:
Right.

Matt Johnson:
And so being able to offer that to our existing customer base is something that we're really excited about doing. And then outside of the launch of the website, continuing to do things that make sure that the website's successful, like running consistent promotional campaigns, banner content, promotions and email marketing. These are the blocking tackling that that marketing ecommerce manager would be doing. And we're able to offer them to small distributors for a fraction of the cost that it would cost them to go out and hire somebody. 

So we work with some distributors, we work with some small distributors. But at the end of the day we know if we're going to move the entire channel forward, we've got to solve for the big, the small, and the medium. And I think we're passionate about helping the little guys stand up against the bigger competitors. This is part of the way. Providing the right talent and the right strategies to help them win online. So I just wanted to point out there is hope if you're sitting there going, "I can't hire somebody now. That's too expensive."

Dave Bent:
Yeah.

Matt Johnson:
There is another way.

Dave Bent:
200%. Even if it actually comes alongside and is at the startup, right, Matt? And for three, six months gets the team adjusted, capable, aware to take it on.

Matt Johnson:
Yeah, I was talking with one of our distributors. I said, "If we do our job well, you're going to be in a position where you're going to be more digitally mature a year from now than you were today. And that might mean that it makes sense for you at that point to go out and hire somebody to fill that position and to do it in-house," so absolutely. The whole idea is to get you to a point where you're standing on two feet and you've kind of got the hang of it.

Dave Bent:
Mm-hmm.

Matt Johnson:
And I think that's a big part of what we're doing. If you want to know more about that, you can go to spinstak.com. Look up ecommerce enablement services. We're going to wrap up, Dave.

I want to wrap up by just plugging the ebook again, because I wrote it and I think it's awesome. But I honestly think, don't just get it and read it. Get it and sit down, and get it to your team, and use it as a talking point to really engage this idea of an ecommerce initiative. My dog's scratching at the door so you know it's time we got to get going. But go to the website, download the Ecom Wheel of Growth, and let us know what you think of it. I'd love feedback, I'd love to hear from you guys. Let us know what you think of the show, and we're looking forward to another episode next week again. 

Enjoy your tequila. You know what they say about tequila.

Dave Bent:
Go on.

Matt Johnson:
One tequila, two tequila, three tequila, floor. 

Dave Bent:
Yeah, well I must've done that on another occasion because the bottle's already empty. 

Matt Johnson:
All right, well cheers my friend.

Thank You for Joining Us!

Thanks for joining us on this episode of the Distributor Pubcast. We hope you enjoyed the show. If you did, we'd love for you to leave us a rating and review on the podcast player of your choice, and you can learn more about us at distributorpubcast.com. This show is presented by ES Tech Group, we're here to help you grow. Until next time, cheers to your growth.

Topics:Distributor Pubcast

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